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The Most Extreme Hiking Tours From Honolulu

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If you’re traveling to Honolulu this season, you have got to check out these extreme hiking tours. Everything from scaling Diamond Head or climbing the Makapu’u Lighthouse is on this incredible list. Grab a buddy and a good pair of hiking shoes, and get ready to climb these amazing spots to get the most astounding views of the island. Bring a swimsuit because many of these hikes lead to waterfalls, and one of the most rewarding things to do after a hike is jump in the refreshing water to cool off.

Check out this list of the most extreme hiking tours from Honolulu:

Hiking at Diamond Head

Diamond Head

If you’re traveling to Honolulu, you have to check out Diamond Head. This volcanic cone is the perfect point to climb and view Waikīkī. The 760-foot summit can be difficult for some travelers, but the views are probably the best on the island. Most tours start early in the morning for you to catch the sunrise, and it’s probably the most magical part of the tour, so don’t miss out. 

Diamond Head viewed from overhead.

Makapu’u Lighthouse Trail

Another great viewscape of Honolulu is the Makapu’u Lighthouse Trail. It’s the perfect place to snap a video for your next Tik Tok. It’s a 2.5-mile hike upwards that will leave you with great views of the neighboring islands of Molokai and Lanai. It’s not necessarily the hardest hike, but it’s great to warm up and see a different side of Honolulu. This is another sunrise hike so expect an early morning start time. 

Lighthouse on cliff.

Manoa Falls

Have you ever wanted to live in Jurassic Park? It’s rumored that the actual movie Jurassic Park was filmed near there. Manoa Falls is close to that, and this 8-mile hike is the most excellent way to pretend to live off the grid. The reward of this hike is Manoa Falls, and taking a dip is highly encouraged. It only takes about an hour one-way (depending on your speed), and be mindful of the weather, as flash floods are known in this area. 

Manoa Falls waterfall in the woods

Ko’olau Waterfall

35-feet is how high Ko’olau Waterfall is, and getting to one of Oahu’s most difficult to reach waterfalls is a goal for many. The hike will take approximately 1.5 hours but the terrain is usually muddy and wet. The average temperature here is 80 degrees, and we wouldn’t blame you for jumping in the water once you get there. Remember to bring some high quality bug spray with you. The humid environment of this trail can cause pests to swarm and can make the hike uncomfortable.

Small waterfall in the woods

Huakai Iki, Haleiwa

Located on Waialua Bay, Haleiwa has excellent tours leading to epic natural monuments and beautiful beaches. Some of the trails are around 7 miles and start at the “Iki” and guide you through different environments, from tricky ridges to lush waterfalls. It’s good for the family since most tours can be adjusted and cater to all ages. 

Huakai Iki, Haleiwa lake with woods surrounding it

The Olomana Trail

Known for snorkeling and other water sports due to its highly calm waters, the North Shore is a great place to stretch and take a hike. It’s also an excellent place for surfing giant waves in places like Waimea Bay and ʻEhukai Beach. One of the hardest trails here is The Olomana. This trail only takes about 3 hours, but it’s all upwards, and getting back down can be tricky. So doing this alone is not suggested. 

The Olomana nature preserve shot of greenery covering a canyon

Do not attempt this climb when the weather is bad; many travelers have had fatal accidents here when conditions are not ideal. Once you pass the uneven terrain and muddy slopes, you’ll reach the top of the first or second peak. There are three peaks in total, but the last requires rock-climbing experience. The views on top of these peaks are some of the best on the island. You’ll be able to see the fantastic sides of Lanikai Beach and the Koolau Mountain Range from this incredible vantage point.


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